baruch haba

Alternative Spellings

barech habo, baruch habo, borech habo, barukh habo, borukh habo, barekh habo, borekh habo, boruch haba, barech haba, borech haba, barukh haba, borukh haba, barekh haba, borekh haba, baruch habe, boruch habe, barech habe, borech habe, barukh habe, borukh habe, barekh habe, borekh habe, borkhabe

Definitions

  • "Welcome!"

Example Sentences

  • "Hi, Vivian, I wasn't expecting you—baruch haba!" (Glinert)
  • "Sung in the style of a traditional Old World badkhn (wedding jester), his texts flits between Old and New World, counterpoising 'a heymishn borekh habo' (a home-style welcome), a phrase with a resonance of traditional Yiddish culture, with 'dem kompakt disk' (this CD), clearly a term recently imported into the Yiddish language." (https://books.google.com/books?id=-SntCwAAQBAJ&pg=PT100&lpg=PT100&dq=%22borekh+habo%22&source=bl&ots=LJzkcwbv46&sig=ACfU3U04DxQvHysfH9v4KqbSavkoeqktfQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiimqi9tfrpAhXiTDABHZmIC_AQ6AEwDnoECA8QAQ#v=onepage&q=%22borekh%20habo%22&f=false)
  • "Baruch Habo to our new friends!"

Languages of Origin

Textual Hebrew

Etymology

ברוך הבא barukh haba 'blessed be the one who comes'

Who Uses This

Religious: Jews who are engaged in religious observance and have some Jewish education
Orthodox: Jews who identify as Orthodox and observe halacha (Jewish law)
Camp: Jews who attend or work at a Jewish overnight summer camp
Israel: Diaspora Jews who feel connected to Israel and have spent time there

Regions

North America

Dictionaries

Yiddish and English: A Century of Yiddish in America, by Sol Steinmetz (Tuscaloosa, 1986).
The Joys of Hebrew, by Lewis Glinert (New York, 1992).
Dictionary of Jewish Usage: A Guide to the Use of Jewish Terms, by Sol Steinmetz (Lanham, MD, 2005).

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